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I'm just using this account to archive the many things I find fascinating about nature.
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thescienceofreality:

Twin Galaxy Stones

A stunning pair of nearly identical Lightning Ridge Black Opals. These rare stone are both more valuable and far more fragile than diamonds. [xAnyone wonder why it’s called Lightning Ridge? These are like lightning bolts that flash and change as they move.

thescienceofreality:

Twin Galaxy Stones
A stunning pair of nearly identical Lightning Ridge Black Opals. These rare stone are both more valuable and far more fragile than diamonds. [x] Anyone wonder why it’s called Lightning Ridge? These are like lightning bolts that flash and change as they move.

thescienceofreality:

Twin Galaxy Stones

A stunning pair of nearly identical Lightning Ridge Black Opals. These rare stone are both more valuable and far more fragile than diamonds. [xAnyone wonder why it’s called Lightning Ridge? These are like lightning bolts that flash and change as they move.





earth-song:

The Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexican state of Sonora. A heavy, slow-moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2.0 ft) long, the Gila monster is the only venomous lizard native to the United States and one of only two known species of venomous lizards in North America, the other being its close relative, the Mexican beaded lizard (H. horridum). Though the Gila monster is venomous, its sluggish nature means that it represents little threat to humans. However, it has earned a fearsome reputation and is sometimes killed despite being protected by state law in Arizona.

( read more ) Photos by Joel Sartore

earth-song:

The Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexican state of Sonora. A heavy, slow-moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2.0 ft) long, the Gila monster is the only venomous lizard native to the United States and one of only two known species of venomous lizards in North America, the other being its close relative, the Mexican beaded lizard (H. horridum). Though the Gila monster is venomous, its sluggish nature means that it represents little threat to humans. However, it has earned a fearsome reputation and is sometimes killed despite being protected by state law in Arizona.

( read more ) Photos by Joel Sartore





malformalady:

Octopus eggs

Photo credit: Simon Chandra

malformalady:


Octopus eggs Photo credit: Simon Chandra

malformalady:

Octopus eggs

Photo credit: Simon Chandra





Close-up of a pink pelican

Close-up of a pink pelican

Close-up of a pink pelican





Toothed Jelly Fungus (Pseudohydnum gelatinosum)

Toothed Jelly Fungus (Pseudohydnum gelatinosum)

Toothed Jelly Fungus (Pseudohydnum gelatinosum)





libels:

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, a psychologist named Harry Harlow did unethical studies on social development in primates. Harlow et al. took newborn rhesus macaques away from their mothers and placed them with “wire mothers” (monkey shaped things that were featureless and made out of wire) or “cloth mothers” (monkey-shaped things that had faces and bodies covered with a soft, warm cloth).

libels:

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, a psychologist named Harry Harlow did unethical studies on social development in primates. Harlow et al. took newborn rhesus macaques away from their mothers and placed them with “wire mothers” (monkey shaped things that were featureless and made out of wire) or “cloth mothers” (monkey-shaped things that had faces and bodies covered with a soft, warm cloth).

libels:

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, a psychologist named Harry Harlow did unethical studies on social development in primates. Harlow et al. took newborn rhesus macaques away from their mothers and placed them with “wire mothers” (monkey shaped things that were featureless and made out of wire) or “cloth mothers” (monkey-shaped things that had faces and bodies covered with a soft, warm cloth).





Deer’s nose

Deer’s nose

Deer’s nose





earth-song:

Swimming with dolphins by joanna czogala

earth-song:

Swimming with dolphins by joanna czogala





❝The size and age of the Cosmos are beyond ordinary human understanding. Lost somewhere between immensity and eternity is our tiny planetary home. In a cosmic perspective, most human concerns seem insignificant, even petty. And yet our species is young and curious and brave and shows much promise. In the last few millennia we have made the most astonishing and unexpected discoveries about the Cosmos and our place within it, explorations that are exhilarating to consider. They remind us that humans have evolved to wonder, that understanding is a joy, that knowledge is prerequisite to survival. I believe our future depends powerfully on how well we understand this Cosmos in which we float like a mote of dust in the morning sky.❞
— Carl Sagan, Cosmos




Eastern Emerald Elysia

Elysia chlorotica is a “solar-powered” marine sea slug that sequesters and retains photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the algae it eats and, remarkably, has incorporated algal genes into its own genetic code. It is emerald green in color often with small red or white markings, has a slender shape typical of members of its genus, and parapodia (lateral “wings”) that fold over its body in life. This sea slug is unique among animals to possess photosynthesis-specific genes and is an extraordinary example of symbiosis between an alga and mollusc as well as a genetic chimera of these two organisms. 

Full article

Eastern Emerald Elysia

Elysia chlorotica is a “solar-powered” marine sea slug that sequesters and retains photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the algae it eats and, remarkably, has incorporated algal genes into its own genetic code. It is emerald green in color often with small red or white markings, has a slender shape typical of members of its genus, and parapodia (lateral “wings”) that fold over its body in life. This sea slug is unique among animals to possess photosynthesis-specific genes and is an extraordinary example of symbiosis between an alga and mollusc as well as a genetic chimera of these two organisms. 

Full article